Imagine if after putting in a full day at the office—and school is pretty much what our children do for a job—you had to come home and do another four or so hours of office work. Monday through Friday. If your job required that kind of work after work, how long would you last?
theatlantic:

Inside the Method to Amazon’s Beautiful Warehouse Madness

They call it “chaotic storage” for a reason. This photo shows a 1.2 million square foot Amazon fulfillment warehouse in Phoenix on November 26, 2012, also known as Cyber Monday, this year’s record breaking online shopping day. It’s a beautiful sea of stuff. Amazon sold over 17 million individual items last year on that day alone, notes ABC News’s Neal Karlinsky and Brandan Baur — and claims it will post bigger numbers this year.

Read more. [Image: AP]

This is so cool/terrifying.

theatlantic:

Inside the Method to Amazon’s Beautiful Warehouse Madness

They call it “chaotic storage” for a reason. This photo shows a 1.2 million square foot Amazon fulfillment warehouse in Phoenix on November 26, 2012, also known as Cyber Monday, this year’s record breaking online shopping day. It’s a beautiful sea of stuff. Amazon sold over 17 million individual items last year on that day alone, notes ABC News’s Neal Karlinsky and Brandan Baur — and claims it will post bigger numbers this year.

Read more. [Image: AP]

This is so cool/terrifying.

theatlantic:

David Rakoff, Essayist and ‘This American Life’ Contributor Has Died at Age 47

Before devoting himself to writing fulltime, Rakoff worked in publishing. At this time, he befriended Ira Glass, then a producer at NPR’s Morning Edition. When Glass went on to create This American Life, he invited Rakoff to read his deadpan essays on the show. Along with David Sedaris, Rakoff would help establish the show’s distinctive voice. Rakoff also began pursuing a career as a prolific freelance journalist for the publications like New York,The New York Times, and Salon. He wrote three books of essays,Fraud, Don’t Get Too Comfortable, and Half Empty, and last year, he was awarded the Thurber Prize for Humor. 

Read more. [Image: Pop!Tech via Flickr]

theatlantic:

David Rakoff, Essayist and ‘This American Life’ Contributor Has Died at Age 47

Before devoting himself to writing fulltime, Rakoff worked in publishing. At this time, he befriended Ira Glass, then a producer at NPR’s Morning Edition. When Glass went on to create This American Life, he invited Rakoff to read his deadpan essays on the show. Along with David Sedaris, Rakoff would help establish the show’s distinctive voice. Rakoff also began pursuing a career as a prolific freelance journalist for the publications like New York,The New York Timesand Salon. He wrote three books of essays,FraudDon’t Get Too Comfortable, and Half Empty, and last year, he was awarded the Thurber Prize for Humor. 

Read more. [Image: Pop!Tech via Flickr]

theatlantic:

Gabby Douglas’s Awesome Night: A GIF Guide

You know in your heart that Gabby Douglas is the most amazing high-flying hero Olympic gymnastics champion, maybe ever. But you need to understand it with your head, too, with a rational and objective analysis of her talent through GIFs.

theatlantic:

Gabby Douglas’s Awesome Night: A GIF Guide

You know in your heart that Gabby Douglas is the most amazing high-flying hero Olympic gymnastics champion, maybe ever. But you need to understand it with your head, too, with a rational and objective analysis of her talent through GIFs.

theatlantic:

During a five-day period earlier this month, 97 percent of the surface of Greenland’s ice sheet thawed.
theatlantic:

The Green Lantern Is Gay

It’s time to tally up the betting pools and start paying out: If you picked Green Lantern as DC Comics surprise gay character you won. But depending on who was making your odds, you probably didn’t win much. As far as the speculation goes, the Green Lantern had been the favorite, mostly because rumors sourced to those in the know had been making their way around the Web for days saying as much.
At DC’s own blog, Alex Nagorski says the newly reimagined Alan Scott experienced “a traumatic event [that] will serve as the catalyst for him assuming his superhero identity as The Green Lantern.”
[Image: DC Comics]


Though not generally a DC fan, this is really cool. I’m always glad to see more Gay/LGBT superheroes! Which reminds me, I have to swing by the Strand and pick up Hero after work tonight.

theatlantic:

The Green Lantern Is Gay

It’s time to tally up the betting pools and start paying out: If you picked Green Lantern as DC Comics surprise gay character you won. But depending on who was making your odds, you probably didn’t win much. As far as the speculation goes, the Green Lantern had been the favorite, mostly because rumors sourced to those in the know had been making their way around the Web for days saying as much.

At DC’s own blog, Alex Nagorski says the newly reimagined Alan Scott experienced “a traumatic event [that] will serve as the catalyst for him assuming his superhero identity as The Green Lantern.”

[Image: DC Comics]

Though not generally a DC fan, this is really cool. I’m always glad to see more Gay/LGBT superheroes! Which reminds me, I have to swing by the Strand and pick up Hero after work tonight.

theatlantic:

Occupy Wall Street’s Debt to Melville

On May 1, students and activists are planning to revive the Occupy Wall Street movement with a general strike. One poster making the rounds on Facebook and other social media features a hamster nervously eyeing a treadmill, and above it the famous words, “I WOULD PREFER NOT TO.” The hamster’s wheel of course represents the drudgery of our modern routines; the phrase, many will recall, comes from Herman Melville’s 1853 story “Bartleby, the Scrivener.” Subtitled “A Tale of Wall Street,” this cryptic narrative traces the sad fate of a passive-aggressive writer who refuses to vacate the offices of a corporate lawyer. Bartleby was the first laid-off worker to occupy Wall Street.
It may seem odd to understand Occupy Wall Street through a story written 150 years before the tents went up in Zuccotti Park, when no one had heard of a human microphone and when Trinity Church was the tallest building in New York. But Bartleby literally does occupy Wall Street — specifically the offices of Melville’s narrator, a lawyer for the 19th century one-percenters who does “a snug business among rich men’s bonds and mortgages and title-deeds.” And the way that Melville represents Bartleby’s occupation can help us understand the power of the endlessly intriguing movement that is promising to return with renewed fervor this spring. What’s more, this staple of the English Literature curriculum can speak to the ways that Wall Street itself is coming to occupy the classroom itself.
Read more.


Even through the Melville lens I’m not sure how I feel about Occupy. I won’t try and parse it all out now, but I think the main points are: 1. My position in life right now doesn’t leave me identifying heavily with my aggrieved 99%-er peers, 2. the protests of my youth had a focus and purpose that I just can’t identify in OWS, and 3. I dislike crowds and ruckus in my space.

Maybe it’s like Twilight– this huge thing that my generation is super into that I just can’t get all the way on board with. I don’t know. Just glad I’m avoiding the City tonight (they were setting up barriers around Union Sq this morning).

theatlantic:

Occupy Wall Street’s Debt to Melville

On May 1, students and activists are planning to revive the Occupy Wall Street movement with a general strike. One poster making the rounds on Facebook and other social media features a hamster nervously eyeing a treadmill, and above it the famous words, “I WOULD PREFER NOT TO.” The hamster’s wheel of course represents the drudgery of our modern routines; the phrase, many will recall, comes from Herman Melville’s 1853 story “Bartleby, the Scrivener.” Subtitled “A Tale of Wall Street,” this cryptic narrative traces the sad fate of a passive-aggressive writer who refuses to vacate the offices of a corporate lawyer. Bartleby was the first laid-off worker to occupy Wall Street.

It may seem odd to understand Occupy Wall Street through a story written 150 years before the tents went up in Zuccotti Park, when no one had heard of a human microphone and when Trinity Church was the tallest building in New York. But Bartleby literally does occupy Wall Street — specifically the offices of Melville’s narrator, a lawyer for the 19th century one-percenters who does “a snug business among rich men’s bonds and mortgages and title-deeds.” And the way that Melville represents Bartleby’s occupation can help us understand the power of the endlessly intriguing movement that is promising to return with renewed fervor this spring. What’s more, this staple of the English Literature curriculum can speak to the ways that Wall Street itself is coming to occupy the classroom itself.

Read more.

Even through the Melville lens I’m not sure how I feel about Occupy. I won’t try and parse it all out now, but I think the main points are: 1. My position in life right now doesn’t leave me identifying heavily with my aggrieved 99%-er peers, 2. the protests of my youth had a focus and purpose that I just can’t identify in OWS, and 3. I dislike crowds and ruckus in my space.

Maybe it’s like Twilight– this huge thing that my generation is super into that I just can’t get all the way on board with. I don’t know. Just glad I’m avoiding the City tonight (they were setting up barriers around Union Sq this morning).

Smith arrived at The Atlantic‘s offices in mid-2007. He worked doggedly his first few months, announcing in October that The Atlantic was going to adopt a digital-first strategy. “We decided to prioritize digital over everything else. We were no longer going to be ‘The Atlantic, which happens to do digital.’ We were going to be a digital media company that also published The Atlantic magazine.”
theatlantic:

A Visual History of Manhattan’s Grid

In the early 19th century most of the 96,000 or so residents of New York City were packed into homes near Manhattan’s southern tip. The island’s principle artery of transportation was not majestic Broadway or sleek Fifth Avenue but a winding dirt route known as the Boston Post Road. The area above what’s now Canal Street was divided into large green estates, and someone describing the environment on Manhattan as a whole would have been more likely to use the word bucolic than congested. See more maps at The Atlantic Cities

theatlantic:

A Visual History of Manhattan’s Grid

In the early 19th century most of the 96,000 or so residents of New York City were packed into homes near Manhattan’s southern tip. The island’s principle artery of transportation was not majestic Broadway or sleek Fifth Avenue but a winding dirt route known as the Boston Post Road. The area above what’s now Canal Street was divided into large green estates, and someone describing the environment on Manhattan as a whole would have been more likely to use the word bucolic than congested. See more maps at The Atlantic Cities

CA » BOS » NYC